Richterman Trail – Cherry Hill, NJ

Richterman Trail – Cherry Hill Trail System – Cherry Hill, Camden County, NJ
Distance: 0.45 miles (one way)
Type: Out-and-back
Difficulty: 1 of 10.
Total score: 2 of 10.

Terrain –Flat woodlands

Trailheads –  39°52’13.55″N,  74°57’25.82″W

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September 24 -I Made It

southjerseytrails:

Back in March, I blabbered on about backpacking and the Appalachian Trail and some thru-hikers I’d be following virtually this season. Today, one of them summited Katahdin. HUGE congrats to Dr. Dave on achieving his dream of doing the whole AT!

Originally posted on Hike It Forward:

Today was a perfect day to summit Katahdin. More details tomorrow but I am officially a Thru-Hiker!!!!!

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Conestoga Trail: Pequea Creek to House Rock – Pequea, PA

Down.

Conestoga Trail: Pequea Creek Campground to House Rock– Pequea, Lancaster County, PA
Distance: 6 miles round trip
Type: Out and back
Difficulty: 8 of 10 – some very steep up and downs, including areas
Total score: 10 of 10.

Terrain – Steep hills, not for the faint of heart.

Trailheads –  39° 53.577’N,  76° 21.480’W (Pequea Creek Campground)

Camping – Pequea Creek Campground – family owned campground run by some really nice people.

Directions – 86 Fox Hollow Road, Pequea, PA 17565

Parking – If camping, park at the campground.  Not sure where you would park otherwise, as I’ve always camped when doing this hike.

Standouts – House Rock with a great view of the Susquehanna River and Wind Cave, which you can explore!

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Old Orchards Trail – Cherry Hill, NJ

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Old Orchards Trail – Cherry Hill Trail System– Cherry Hill, Camden County, NJ
Distance: Just under a mile of trails
Type: Figure 8.
Difficulty: 1 of 10.
Total score: 3 of 10.

Maintained by the good people at Cherry Hill Trail Crew

Terrain – Forest and meadow

Trailheads –  39° 53.242’N,  74° 57.223’W

Directions: Located on Thornhill Road in Cherry Hill, NJ.

Parking – Along Thornhill Road or a few spots at the playground.

Standouts – No real standouts, but a nice little hike.

Markings – Color coded signs at intersections

Description -

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As always, a nice job by the Cherry Hill Trail Crew.  This path meanders through a small patch of forest and meadow back in the Old Orchards neighborhood.  You can park at the small lot near the playground on Thornhill Road, or there is an entrance at the back of the soccer fields at the middle school.

The trail is short, but the woods are nice, I saw five deer, and there’s a small meadow (with a crushed stone pathway) to break it up a bit.  If you’re up for a bit more exploring, leave the trail at the crushed stone part and wander along the stream bank.  Maybe they’ll expand the trails down that way soon, it wouldn’t surprise me.

Road connection past the playground to the trails.

Road connection past the playground to the trails.

Small creek next to the lead in trail.

Small creek next to the lead in trail.

As always, the trails are marked with color coded signs.

As always, the trails are marked with color coded signs.

When is this bum going to hike on his own?  He's almost 5 months old!

When is this bum going to hike on his own? He’s almost 5 months old!

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Trail toward the middle school fields.

Trail toward the middle school fields.

Popped off the trail into the soccer fields.  Turn around here and you can do the other half of the loop.

Popped off the trail into the soccer fields. Turn around here and you can do the other half of the loop.

Nice trees.

Nice trees.

He's trying to figure out how I got ahead of him.

He’s trying to figure out how I got ahead of him.

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Somewhere in this picture there are five deer hiding.

Somewhere in this picture there are five deer hiding.

Well constructed bit of trail.  There is still a pile of stone to be spread out, so the rest of this part of the trail should be really nice.

Well constructed bit of trail. There is still a pile of stone to be spread out, so the rest of this part of the trail should be really nice.

Oh no!  Rain! (Hard to see in this picture)

Oh no! Rain! (Hard to see in this picture)

Overall recommendation: Nice little twenty minute hike if you’re in the area.

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Palmyra Nature Cove Revisted – Palmyra, NJ

Our second guest post!  This one is from my buddy Dave, who (along with his wife Mary) have been loyal followers of this blog, suggesting some great trails that I’ve gone to check out, and hiking many of the trails featured here.  Thanks for sharing your adventure Dave and Mary!

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Palmyra Nature Cover (Revisted) – Palmyra, Burlington County, NJ

Distances: 8 miles of trails (this hike covered four miles)
Difficulty: 2 of 10
Rating: 8 of 10

Highlights: Wildlife and views of Pennsylvania and the bridges

Took advantage of the recent cool weather and got in a 4 mile walk at this hidden gem.  It’s located at the foot of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge on the South Jersey side. Just take the jug handle for in front of the F.C. Kerbeck auto dealer and follow the signs to the park.  The park has a large visitors center which was closed before we finished but definitely worth checking out.  The first thing to mention about this is that it is a nature park. That means no pets allowed. (Our dog Jodi was rather insulted by this).  The trade off is you can walk right up to wild turkeys and deer with no problem.  We saw a group of about 8 turkeys and over 6 deer during our trip.

 

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Bortons Mill Trails – Cherry Hill, NJ

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Bortons Mills Trails – Cherry Hill, Camden County, NJ
Distance: Maybe a mile and half of trails with all the loops (we did 0.9 miles)
Type: interlocking loops
Difficulty: 1 of 10.
Total score: 3 of 10.

Website: www.cherryhilltrailcrew.com/

Note: This trail connects across the street with the

Terrain – flat, immature forest

Trailheads –  39° 53.759’N,  75° 0.863’W (Bortons Mill Road)
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Directions: Parking lot is on Bortons Mill Road at the intersection of Kitty Hawk Road.

Parking: Lot (used mostly for soccer fields there)
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Standouts – A nice walk through the trees

Markings – Well labeled trails by color
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Map:
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Description: This is a nice, simple walk through some fairly young forest.  No great views, not much of a chance for animals, no challanging climbs, you won’t even escape road noise, but a pleasant way to spend thirty minutes.

We made a big loop of the blue, brown, yellow, and red trails, but there is plenty of room to poke around the woods.

Getting started.

Getting started.

Someone is excited.

Someone is excited.

Some parts are in the trees, others are mown paths.

Some parts are in the trees, others are mown paths.

Someone got a new hat that he won't leave the house without.

Someone got a new hat that he won’t leave the house without.

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Overall recommendation: Not worth driving out of your way for, but a nice little walk if you’re close.

BONUS: This trail connects to the Croft Farm Trails (just cross Brace Road), which has further connections to the Hopkins Pond Trail and the Watchable Wildlife Trail, with a connecting trail all the way out to Cooper River Park in Pennsauken. With all the connections, you could easily turn this into a hike of a dozen miles.

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Trails East of Tracks – Wenonah Woods – Wenonah, NJ


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Trails east of the railroad tracks – Eldridge Loop, Indian Trail, Monongahela Brook Trail and Loop, Comey’s Lake Loop, and Garden Trail – Wenonah Woods Trails – Wenonah, Gloucester County, NJ

* NOTE – The Wenonah Conservation Area has a lot of trails and miles, I’ve decided to split it up but what’s east and west of the railroad tracks that split the town (which is how their map also splits it up).

Distance – 2.25 trail miles or so for recommended trip and a little under 1/4 mile roadwalk back to car.  Signs and maps disagree, and we missed a 1/2 mile trail, but clocked 1.9 on the GPS (not counting the road walk)
Type: Interlocking loops and a one-way trail.  Figure 8 with the roadwalk.
Difficulty: 4 of 10 – some ups and downs and a few trails on hillsides with tricky footing.
Total score: 7 of 10.

Website – Wenonah Trail System
Facebook page – Of course – Friends of Wenonah Trails

Terrain – marsh, woods, hills

Trailheads –  39° 47.156’N,  75° 8.720’W (Eldridge Loop Trailhead),  39° 47.057’N,  75° 8.470’W (Indian Trail Trailhead),  39° 47.146’N,  75° 8.916’W (Garden Trail Trailhead)

Directions – I parked at the Eldridge Loop Trailhead, on Pine Street just past the intersection with Princeton Ave in Wenonah, NJ

Parking – streetside parking

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Standouts – Lots of bridges over creeks, deep woods, some interesting walks up and down hills

Markings –No blazes, but use wooden signs at intersections.  Follow the wooden signs and the worn path (was a little confusing on the Indian Trail, but otherwise pretty clear).

Description -

It was a beautiful, warm 80 degree Friday, and I had off from work, so The Pres and I headed down to Wenonah to check out a series of trails that the town has built over the years.  I’d be given a heads up on these ones from James (who has a nice blog about pizza in Glassboro for those in need of the low down on Glassboro pizza) when I started this blog up back whenever I started this blog.

Because The Pres has short legs and I have a sizable gut, we decided to break down this series of trails into sections, focusing on the trails East of the train tracks that cut through town

We started at the Eldridge Trail at Pine Street.  Make a right from the road onto the trail!

Start of the trail.

Start of the trail.

Recognition for one of the fine people who made this system happen.

Recognition for one of the fine people who made this system happen.

Follow the trail down a series of spread out steps until you reach a bridge.  No handrails, so cross carefully.  You’ll notice that the trail splits to the right almost immediately after this.  Stay to the left on the Eldridge Trail.  You’ll cross another bridge, then some planks over marshy bits.  Finally, you’ll end up at an intersection.  The Eldridge Trail goes straight, the Indian Trail goes right.

Down the steps.  Run, run, run, run, run.

Down the steps. Run, run, run, run, run.

Some nice little views through the trees.

Some nice little views through the trees.

Keep running.

Keep running.

The first bridge.

The first bridge.

Nice little view from the bridge.

Nice little view from the bridge.

First intersection.  Stay left.

First intersection. Stay left.

The second, much smaller bridge.

The second, much smaller bridge.

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Boards.

Boards.

Intersection with the Indian Trail.

Intersection with the Indian Trail.

Not having a map (the office closed at 1 PM on Friday, we got there at 2… whoops), we decided to take the Indian Trail, which is listed as 0.25 miles.  In retrospect, don’t, it is just a connection with Indian Trail Road.  If you follow it, you just end up in a cul-de-sac and have to come back the way that you came.

Woods.

Woods.

More woods.

More woods.

Lovely woods.

Lovely woods.

Emerging onto the paved road.

Emerging onto the paved road.

So after our 1/2 mile detour, we ended up back at the Eldridge Trail where we’d left it.

This looks familiar.

This looks familiar.

Because it is.

Because it is.

Back on the Eldridge Trail to complete our 3/4 mile loop through some really nice swamps and over some lovely bridges.

Trail.

Trail.

Monongahela Brook Loop turnoff.  We didn't turn here because someone was acting tired, but I totally suggest adding this loop to your hike.

Monongahela Brook Loop turnoff. We didn’t turn here because someone was acting tired, but I totally suggest adding this loop to your hike.

Of course, someone immediately decided he wasn't tired after all.  Oh well.

Of course, someone immediately decided he wasn’t tired after all. Oh well.

Run, run, run, run, run.

Run, run, run, run, run.

Awesome knobby tree.

Awesome knobby tree.

Did I mention how nice these trails were?

Did I mention how nice these trails were?

A few open patches.

A few open patches.

But mostly just a cool, shady walk.

But mostly just a cool, shady walk.

End of the Eldridge Loop.

End of the Eldridge Loop.

The end of the Eldrige Loop Trail will bring you to Comey’s Lake.  There is a nice bench there to sit at and admire the water.  You can then go left and follow the trail past the house up the road.  OR, you can hang a left and complete the Comey’s Lake Loop (3/4 of a mile).  This loop is a little more challanging than the Eldridge Loop, with some unexpected short climbs.  I totally suggest going with option 2.

The trail follows the water until it runs out, then follows the swamp muck until you reach a split in the trail.  Left goes across a bridge to the other side of the lake.  Right goes up to a really nice pavilion that is great for a picnic.  If you go up to the pavilion, you do have to backtrack to the split at some point (can’t live there, no matter how nice it is!)

We made it to the lake!

We made it to the lake!

Mr. Stewert, you are awesome.

Mr. Stewert, you are awesome.

Water and goldfish break.

Water and goldfish break.

We headed right to go around the lake.

We headed right to go around the lake.

At the split int he trail.

At the split int he trail.

View of the pavilion from the bridge.

View of the pavilion from the bridge.

From here, it’s a short climb up to the ridge.  The trail will follow the ridge for a while, stopping to decend and then re-climb a few times.  The most interesting is the enclosed steps.  Don’t follow them to the bottom, that’s not the trail.  Exit at the gap.  This route will eventually bring you to an entrance/exit in the fence at the road, next to the nice house.

Stairs!  You can see the gap to get out.

Stairs! You can see the gap to get out.

We, of course, did not notice it until the bottom.

We, of course, did not notice it until the bottom.

Some nice drop off here.

Some nice drop off here.

This is a really nice trail.  I think I said that already.

This is a really nice trail. I think I said that already.

The exit.

The exit.

We, of course, didn’t get off at the exit, and instead headed back down the path to the lake, headed out on the dock, then realized that the trail back to the car was up at the top where the gap in the fence was.  Whoops.

Still, not a bad turn to miss if we got this.

Still, not a bad turn to miss if we got this.

Someone climbed up to take a look.  Don't let his mom know.

Someone climbed up to take a look. Don’t let his mom know.

So we backtracked and walked down the road back to the car and trailhead.  This is the “official” trail, there is no other connection.

Head down the road.

Head down the road.

Stern, but timely, warning.

Stern, but timely, warning.

We made it!

We made it!

Having found the car, The Pres decided he was upset because he wasn’t done hiking, even after two miles.  So we headed back down the Eldridge Trail to where the Monogahela Brook Trail (not to be confused with the Monogahela Brook Loop, while shares some of it’s treadway, just not here) had come in and hang a right.

Remember this place?

Remember this place?

It’s a 1/4 mile to South Marion Road and the highway bridge.  This 1/2 mile has some tricky footing (see also: Difficulty 4 rating), so be careful!  It’s an interesting little jog in the trail.

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Steep.

Steep.

The Pres and I both slipped about here.

The Pres and I each slipped about here.

Made it to the stream!

Made it to the stream!

Here, we turned up the road and completed our loop with a road walk.  That was dumb, don’t do that.

Instead, cross over South Marion Road and keep going about another 1/4 mile to where the Monogahela Brook Trail ends.  There, there should be another intersection.  One way will be the beginning of the Mantua Creek Trail (which we’ll talk about some other time, as it quickly crosses the tracks and into our next adventure here), the other way will be the very short Garden Trail, which will bring you up to Clinton Street and the playground.  You can then walk straight down Pine Street for 0.2 miles to your waiting car.  This is the same distance as what we did, only a safer roadwalk and a nice bit of forest to boot.

This concludes our “East of the Tracks” trails.  The only trail on this side of the tracks not accounted for is the unconnected 0.3 mile Wenonah School Trail, which we’ll do sometime and tack in here, deleting this current ending as if it had never been there at all.

Overall recommendation: I LOVE these trails.  Interesting, well maintained, with some tricky parts to make it really interesting.  And I have another one or two trips to cover the rest of the this system, which is something I’m looking forward to.

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